MALU MAI WELLNESS CONSULTANCY
             
                                          ABN: 25 603 157 473  
                                      ACN: 603 157 473

                                                     MALU MAI WELLNESS CONSULTANCY
                   ABN: 25 603 157 473 / ACN: 603 157 473

ACN 603 157 473 / ABN 42 157 312 727

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WORLD FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE CONFERENCE: 

Say it Loud, Say it Clear...We Were Always Here!!


*23, 24 -26 August, 2016

Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, South Brisbane, Australia

Conference Venue ~ Rooms B1, B2 & B3 (1st Floor) on the Grey Street Entrance...

(up from the Southbank Cineplex)


*Please note the Traditional Welcome to Country will be held on the 23rd of August, 2016 at Musgrave Park / Jagera Arts Hall, South Brisbane.


WORLD FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE 

CONFERENCE THEMES


The World First Nations Traditional Knowledge Conference is centred on these key themes as outlined;


1. LORE: Traditional Lore and Customary Practices; this session will include dialogue around the importance of maintaining our Lores and Customary Practices for the betterment of our First Nations Communities here and around the World.



2. KNOWLEDGE: First Nations Knowledge and Ways of Being; this session will involve the collective sharing of First Nations Knowledge and Ways of Being, our epistemology, how do we know what we know? It will incorporate the wisdom handed down from our Ancestors.



3. CULTURE: Making meaning of our Cultural Stories, Songs, Languages and Dances; this session will explore our cultural stories, songs shared through language and dance.



4. MEDICINE: Traditional Medicines & Ways of Healing; this session will explore Traditional ways of Healing and through ancient Knowledge & Wisdom from our Elders and Ancestors.



5. SPIRIT: Wellness Pathways for our Spiritual, Social, Emotional & Psychological Health and Wellbeing; this session will encompass the core components for health and wellness utilising Traditional Knowledge Systems.



6. LAW: Cultural Ways of Knowing & Cultural Ways of Doing in Law & Justice; discussions and dialogue in this session will examine core components of Traditional Knowledge & Traditional Ways of Doing to address issues surrounding Law and Justice.



FOR ONLINE REGISTRATION PLEASE CLICK ON THIS LINK...

http://goo.gl/forms/6lFQba5cqB

C O N F E R E N C E   P R O G R A M 


WORLD FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE:


SAY IT LOUD, SAY IT CLEAR; WE WERE ALWAYS HERE!



24 – 26 August, 2016~ Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre


South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia


~ Rooms B1, B2 & B3 (1st Floor) on the Grey Street 


Entrance...(up from the Southbank Cineplex)




Jagera Arts Community Hall




We pay Homage & Respect to the Traditional Owners, Ancestors, Elders and Custodians of the Australian Land, Waterways, Seas and Islands...




DAY ONE TUESDAY 23rd August, 2016 - 

Venue: Jagera Arts Community Hall, 121 Cordelia Street, South Brisbane


6:45 – 7:30 MC Pammy White & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop - Dawn Ceremony / Traditional Welcome to Country – Kerry Charlton & Team


7:45 – 9:30 Cuppa & Breakfast


9: 40 – 10:20 Dance, Poetry & Song:

Aunty Dawn Daylight

Darlene Auger & Lisa Richards


10:30 – 12:20 Panel of Speakers:

Professor Gracelyn Smallwood,  Dr Otrude Moyo, Aunty Viola Sheridan, Aunty Christine Barney

Aunty Mona Phillips, Aunty Valda Coolwell, Reverend Alexandra Gater,  Aunty Betty McGrady


12:30 - 2:30 Lunch

Presenters:

Aunty Dawn Daylight




DAY TWO - Wednesday 24th August, 2016

Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre



MORNING SESSION

Theme 1. LORE: Traditional Lore and Customary Practices


8:00 – 8:45 Registration / Tea & Coffee

8:50 – 9:00 Housekeeping & Introduction: MC – Pammy White & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop

9:00 – 9:25 Traditional Owners Session – Kerry Charlton


9:30 – 10:30 Keynote Address: Whaea Te Raina Ferris & Dr Payi Linda Ford


10:35 – 10:55 MORNING TEA (20 mins)


11:00 – 12:30 

Special Guest Presenters: Poetry /Song - Dr Michael Adams, Rose Elu,

Ms. Jeannie Bell.


12:30 – 1:15 LUNCH (60 mins)



AFTERNOON SESSION 

Theme 2. KNOWLEDGE: First Nations Knowledge and Ways of Being


Facilitator/s: Dr Gregory Phillips & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop


1:15 – 2:15 Keynote Address: Mr Eilif Norvang, Dr Otrude Moyo


2:20 – 3:30

Special Guest Presenters: Mr Issac Akande, Ms Merepaea Manukau, Dr Vanessa Lee


3:35 – 3:55 AFTERNOON TEA (20 mins)


3:55 – 4:50 

Special Guest Presenters - Ms Wendy Watego, Mr Stephen Corporal


5:30 – 7:30 Earth Law Presentations at Avid Reader Bookshop, Boundary Street,

West End.


Presenters: Michael Connolly, Michelle Malone and Ross Williams

Poetry: Dr Vanessa Lee 



DAY THREE - ELDERS DAY Thursday 25th August, 2016


MORNING SESSION 

Theme 3. CULTURE: Making meaning of our Cultural Stories, Songs, Languages and Dances

Theme 4. MEDICINE: Traditional Medicines and Ways of Healing


8:30 – 8:45 Housekeeping & Introduction: MCs – Kerry Charlton & Wendy Watego Ittensohn

Song - Rochelle Pitt Watson


8:50 – 10:20 Plenary Session Elders Panel:

Aunty Kathy Brown, Aunty Flo Watson, Aunty Val, Aunty Valda Coolwell, Uncle Albert Holt, Aunty Millianna Davey, Aunty Rayleen Burns, Aunty Christine Barney, Aunty Glenice Croft, Dr Lilla Watson, Dr Mary Graham, Aunty Mona Phillips, Whaea Raina Ferris, Eilif Norvang, Uncle Thomas Sebasio, Aunty Rose Elu, Uncle Terry Williams, Reverend Alexandra Gater, Aunty Edna Billy, Uncle Sam Watson, Uncle Des Sandy, Aunty Mary Martin, Aunty Jennifer Thompson, Aunty Betty McGrady, Aunty Dawn Daylight, Aunty Bess Catley, Aunty Valmai Burns, Jeannie Bell.


10:30 – 10:50 MORNING TEA (20 mins)


11:00 – 12:30 Concurrent Sessions Venue: B1, B2, B3


Facilitators: Gregory Phillips & Darlene Auger - Song - Rochelle Pitt Watson


Elders Presentations: Aunty Flo Watson, Aunty Valda Coolwell, Aunty Mary Martin, Aunty Elaine Peckham, Jeannie Bell, Aunty Christine Barney, Uncle Terry Williams, Uncle Thomas Sebasio, Aunty Betty McGrady, Uncle Des Sandy


12:30 – 1:15 LUNCH (60 mins)


1:20 – 3:15 AFTERNOON SESSION: 

 Facilitators: Sara, Holly Pedersen & Issac Akande


Elders and Young People Dialogue

All Elders in groups of 10 in Rm B1, B2 & B3 with young people aged between 18 – 30.

Young People: Darren Brady, Tj Diop, Murrawah Maroochy, Ami Diop, Nancy Belthuis,

Sara Ahmed, - other young people to be advised


3:20 – 3:40 AFTERNOON TEA (20 mins)

3:45 – 4:50 Elders Plenary Session in all rooms.


5:30 – 7:30 Presentations Caring for Mother Earth at Avid Reader Bookshop, Boundary Street,

West End. 


Presenters to be advised

Music: Avi & Band

Poetry: Bernard Kelly-Edwards, Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop


DAY FOUR - Friday 26th August, 2016


MORNING SESSION

Theme 5. SPIRIT: Wellness Pathways for our Spiritual, Social, Emotional & Psychological 

Health & Wellbeing


8:30 – 9:00 Housekeeping & Introduction: MC –  Ms Wendy Watego Ittensohn, Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop


9:00 – 10:30 Keynote Address: Ms Darlene Auger, Dr Gregory Phillips


10:35 – 10:55 MORNING TEA (20 mins)


Song / Poetry


11:00 – 12:30 Facilitator/s: Mrs Margie Kennedy & Ms Wendy Watego Ittensohn


Special Guest Presenters: Ms Rochelle Pitt Watson, Ms Rachel Petero, Ms Pammy White,

Aunty Mary Martin, Aunty Jennifer Thomson, Aunty Christine Barney


12:30 – 1:15 LUNCH (60 mins)


AFTERNOON SESSION

Theme 6. LAW: Cultural Ways of Knowing & Cultural Ways of Doing in Law & Justice


1:15 – 2:15 Keynote Address: Professor Boni Robertson, Reverend Alexandra Gater


2:20 – 3:10 - Plenary

Special Guest Presenters: Uncle Sam Watson, Mr Getano Bann  


3:20 – 3:40 AFTERNOON TEA (20 mins)


3:45 - 4:45

Special Guest Presenters: 

Aunty Betty McGrady, Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop



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DINNER ENTERTAINMENT - Friday Evening 26th August, 2016


6:30 – 6:45pm   Arrival – (Please present dinner ticket at registration desk)

7:00pm Dinner 

7:15pm MC - Mr Getano Bann

7:20pm Special Guest Speaker: Mr Danny Morseu 

7:40pm Lucky Door Prize draw - Ms Aminata Diop

Auction - Mr Getano Bann

                           Raffle Draw - Ms Holly Pedersen


8:00 - 12pm 

                          Guest Performers & Poets

                          Roydon & Jemma

                          Bernard Kelly-Edwards

                          UQ South Pacific Islander Association Dancers

                          Troy Brady

                          Getano Bann

                          Glenn Skuthorpe

                          Rochelle Watson Pitt

                          George Alfred & Band





*Please note that some presenters, Elders and performers named here may not be present on the day due to illness or family & work commitments, we apologise for any inconvenience, thank you.




REPORTING BACK - 

FROM THE JUNE, 2015 TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE CONFERENCE:

  

Good Morning Beautiful Family, Friends and Relations; It is very humbling and such an honour to report that the Traditional Knowledge Conference was absolutely wonderful!! The Essence and the Spirit of the Traditional Owners who graced us with their presence to do Welcome to Country was magical! A Huge Thank you to Uncle Des Sandy, Sissy Kerry Charlton and the Goori Dancers.


There is no English word that I can use to describe my feelings and the incredible Respect and Love that I and others felt to hear the Wise Words of Wisdom from our Beautiful Elders sharing their stories and their Knowledge with us...Wow!! 


The Love and Respect for one another was unbelievable! beyond my wildest expectation, the atmosphere was electric! there were lots of tears and lots of laughter & Joy. On the Night of the Dinner when People were on the floor dancing, I looked around and every single person on the dance floor had the biggest smiles on their faces, Amazing!! 


People came together in a spirit of Love, Respect, Unity and Harmony to share and to celebrate our Knowledge, another Way of looking at the world, another Way of interpreting the world, another way of Being in this world. A beautiful Way of Being in this World that has kept us strong in Body, Mind, Heart, Soul and Spirit for Thousands and Thousands of Years.


The June 2015 Traditional Knowledge Conference created a culturally safe space for discourse on First Nations Australians Ways of Knowing and Ways of Doing. It included dialogue pertaining to the implementation of Traditional Knowledge through Research, Education, Culture and Traditional Practices. It explored the multifaceted social, emotional, spiritual, environmental and political issues impacting on the lives of First Nations Australians in today's evolving society.


The conference brought the voices of some of Australia’s most recognized Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Elders, Leaders, Scholars and Educators to the forefront.  It enriched the professional development and practice of practitioners from multidisciplinary backgrounds.  It assisted in shedding a light on the many questions and assist mainstream practitioners in gaining a better understanding and clearer insight into working with First Nations Australians. Our core objective and vision was to bring the voices of our Elders to the forefront, and to provide a platform for our Elders to share their wisdom and their knowledge in a culturally safe space. We extended a warm welcome to people from all walks of life from the grassroots community and to practitioners from both government and non-government sectors. 


It also brought together the lived experiences of health workers, social workers, community workers & practitioners from multidisciplinary backgrounds to come together in a spirit of unity, harmony and peace to share their knowledge in an environment where their voices are respected.


I take this opportunity to express my utmost Gratitude and Thanks to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community and members of the non-Indigenous Community in Brisbane who came together and donated and volunteered their time with such Love, Passion and Dedication to make this Event successful and was it ever!!! I have lived in Brisbane for over 30 years and I am very Proud to be part of this Community, THANK YOU!! Big Big Respect, Love you all to the Moon and Beyond. We are having a rest now and will soon be preparing ourselves for the next one in 2016 this one will the World's First Nations Traditional Knowledge Conference.

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REGISTRATION DETAILS:


Date: *23, 24, 25 and 26, August, 2016

Venue: Brisbane Convention Centre, South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Cost: $880... (inclusive of GST)


Early Bird: $660... (inclusive of GST) / Registration and payment must be received by May 31, 2016.


Conference Dinner & Entertainment: $60 (inclusive of GST) 

{Please note: This price is for conference delegates only, those wishing to attend the dinner only, the cost is $100 per person}



All Welcome...Who should attend:

Scholars, Educators, Researchers, Elders, Community Members, Counsellors, Social Scientists, Cross-Cultural Educators, Social Workers, Community Development Workers, Human Service Workers, Health Workers, Traditional Healers, Holistic Practitioners and Natural Therapists etc.


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Registration will be accepted and confirmed upon Payment via Bank Transfer to: 


Commonwealth Bank of Australia

Account Name: MALU MAI WELLNESS CONSULTANCY PTY LTD
BSB: 064-138
ACCOUNT NO: 1063 2400


Or for payment via Paypal, Scroll down below



For the Traditional Knowledge Conference Registration Form & Tax Invoice, please send your details via telephone or email to:


Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop PhD (UQ 2010)

Managing Director, Malu Mai Consultancy Pty. Ltd.

Telephone: 0459 508 460

Email: [email protected] or [email protected]

Website: http://www.malumaiconsultancy.com



**Please note: 

The Conference is a fundraising initiative to aid in the development of our Community Wellness Project.


 

FOR CREDIT CARD PAYMENT VIA PAYPAL ~~~ PAY HERE


Please click on the 'Buy Now' button below for FULL Conference Registration Payment

Please click here for 2 DAYS attendance Registration Payment

Please click here for 1 DAY attendance Registration Payment


Please click on the 'Buy Now' button below to add Conference Dinner.


For those attending the Conference Dinner ONLY ~ Please click here  

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WORLD FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE CONFERENCE 

VENUE: BRISBANE CONVENTION & EXHIBITION CENTRE

Showcasing the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre ~ 
Home of the Traditional Knowledge Conference

Brisbane City Views

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We are proud to announce that X FACTOR DIVA AND SOUL MAMA ROCHELLE PITT WATSON will be performing for us at the World First Nations Traditional Knowledge Conference 2016


We proudly present the Deadly Brother Troy Brady 

                     Proudly presenting Music Legend Glenn Skuthorpe                                   

Glenn Skuthorpe's Music "No more whispering" is the soundtrack in this documentary

Our Deadly Duo - Sister and Brother Duet Jemma-Rae and Roydon Boyd

Music Therapist extraordinaire, Singer, Songwriter...Getano Bann title


Special Guest Presenter & Performer Rochelle Pitt Watson, Nurse / Care Coordinator/ Kidney Health Australia Ambassador.

Care Coordination & Supplementary Services 

Program, Apunipima, Cape York Health Council


Biography: Rochelle Pitt has always loved music. She recalls beginning her musical journey at a young age, performing in the churches and choirs of Far North Queensland.

Growing up, she fondly remembers learning most of her vocal skills from listening to her Aunties and Uncles singing the old gospel hymns and realising very early the power of music and voice. It wasn’t until the age of 23 however that Rochelle went on to start singing professionally while on break from Nursing Studies. 


During this time, she released her first EP, “Black to Reality”, a body of work full of uplifting and inspirational songs for her first nation people. The EP went on to feature what would become an anthem for indigenous and non indigenous women alike. 


The track ‘Too Deadly My Sister’ still gets significant play on indigenous community radio to this day!  Being a professional Singer/Songwriter and Nurse has not only helped to shape Rochelle’s life path, but also her mission to make a statement about the strength, beauty and love we all have within us. Her vocal tone and ability emits power and conviction that can stop a crowd in it’s tracks and give goose bumps to all who listen to her god given gift.  After taking an extended break from pursing music, Rochelle decided to start performing again and auditioned for Australian Indigenous Choir ‘Austranesia’, which was started by the Gondwana choir founder. During this time, she released another original track, ‘Motha Ailan’ about Darnley Island in the Torres Straits.


It was in 2014 however that Pitt found a national audience after catapulting herself into the lounge rooms of Australia when she auditioned for hit series, The X Factor Australia.  Little was Rochelle to know the significant impact she would make on the audiences of Australia, or the transformation that would take place within her own life as a result of her time on the series. It was during the X Factor journey that Rochelle went from being an everyday Nurse and Mother, to becoming Australia’s very own Soul Mumma. As the competition progressed, so did Rochelle’s confidence as a performer where week after week, she went on to blow judges and audiences alike away with powerful and energetic performances of tracks by artists such as, ‘Aretha, Tina Tuner, Rebecca Ferguson, Adele and popular groups ‘Gossip and The Rolling Stones’. Pitt would go on to place 8th overall in the 2014 season.


Post X Factor, the journey has only gone from strength to strength for this Cairns based performer. Corporate events & festivals followed suit and in 2015 Rochelle was named Ambassador for Kidney Health Australia, a cause close to both her nursing profession and heart. 2015 also saw the release of Pitt’s first commercial single, “Good Thing Coming”, and in 2016 she will head into the studio to begin production on her highly anticipated new album due for release later in the year.


In addition to plans of a new music release, Rochelle will be making a number of special appearances around the country and plans are well underway for a live show experience, coming soon!  If there is one thing for certain, it’s that music is and always will be part this Songstresses life. Age is no barrier nowadays, so there is no stopping Soul Mumma Rochelle from pursing her destiny. 

Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Aunty Mona Phillips, Mt Isa


Biography:  Aunty Mona Phillips from the Waanyi and Jaru Peoples, and comes from Cloncurry and Mount Isa.  She was born in Mount Isa in 1942 and is the third last child in a family of 16 children.  She married in 1965 and have 6 children, Ashley, Sean (deceased) John, Cindy, Levina, Tracey and Gregory.


She started work at 13 doing domestic work as a cleaner, waitress, cook and regular housework.  Aunty Mona has worked extensively in various positions in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander welfare, social justice, health promotion.  In 1992 she travelled to Edmonton in Canada and studied with the Native Canadians on social health and the effects of alcohol and drugs, graduating at the NECHI Institute.  In 1998, she studied at Curtin University and gained a Degree in Applied Science majoring in Aboriginal Community Management and Development.  


For over 40 years, Aunty Mona worked for remote communities in Northern Territory and Queensland and recently retired in June 2015.  Now retired and looking forward to doing nothing, however, she is still heavily involved in the grassroots community and is the Deputy Chair on the Board of Gidgee Aboriginal Medical Services in Mount Isa. 

Keynote Presenter: Professor Boni Robertson, Professor Indigenous Policy and Director of the Office of Indigenous Community Engagement, Policy and Partnerships, Griffith University



Biography: Professor Boni Robertson is a proud Aboriginal woman from the Kabi Kabi Nation from Queensland and has spent the past 35 years working in Indigenous Affairs and Indigenous Higher education at the State, National and International level.


Dr Robertson currently holds executive appointments on Indigenous higher education forums at the national and international level, regularly representing the National Indigenous Higher Education Consortium at the United Nations Permanent Forum in New York to raise issues relevant to Indigenous higher education; she is currently on the Executive Committee of the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium; the Board of Governors of the World Indigenous Nations University, the World Indigenous Research Alliance and in 2014 was proudly elected to represent education for the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific at the World Conference for Indigenous Peoples, organised by the President of the United Nations General Assembly in New York.


Professor Robertson has extensive advocacy and community experience having established major initiatives and programs to enhance the emotional and social wellbeing of Indigenous Australians, particularly, Indigenous women, children and families. Professor Robertson has made a significant contribution to social policy at the state and national level and improved the lives of Indigenous people through the provision of pathways into education, training, employment and overall life enhancement. 


Professor Robertson’s research, policy and advocacy have also contributed to the development of specific programs designed to meet targeted areas in Indigenous communities such as women, children, youth families and Elders. Further to this, her research has helped to develop economic and social infrastructures within communities and created appropriate networks to enhance and sustain the quality of life and wellbeing of Indigenous families and youth.


Professor Robertson has approached her research, policy, advocacy and community engagement initiatives on a commitment to engaging with Elders and community based representatives in the spirit of partnerships to enhance their contribution to policy formation, service delivery and program evaluations as it impacts upon their own health and wellbeing. This is in keeping with her commitment encouraging lifelong learning, stakeholder involvement and community impact and proactive change. This has also helped to inform the non-Indigenous community about Indigenous issues and enhance policy and program outcomes for Indigenous Australians.

Proudly present our Deady Brother, Storyteller, Photographer, Bernard Kelly-Edwards... who will be sharing his poetry and showcasing some of his beautiful photographic pieces at the World First Nations Traditional Knowledge Conference :-D


Biography: Bernard is a unique storyteller with a passion for connecting the beauty of the land and listen to others in a way of support.  Bernard is a self-taught photographer and creative writer; his work is deeply rooted to his Ancestors and his way of living.


Bernard received the Innovator/Creator of the Year Award whilst studying at Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Studies in 2009 and is also a Certified NLP Practitioner.


Bernard's father was born in Bellingen in 1938 and is heavily rooted to land but sees the need to assist in healing people in turn to heal the land.  Bernard is the last of 13 children and has a deep passion in listening to those in need.


Bernard started taking photography seriously back in 2005 and since then has developed his own style of art through canvas work, poetry and more recently his love of bass guitar has started its own journey.


Come and listen to Bernard's unique story telling style and be inspired by words that connect all of us.  


"Being here is where I am supposed to be"

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It is very humbling to announce that the World First Nations Traditional Knowledge Conference is a unique Gathering of the Voices of some of our Deadliest First Nations Elders, Leaders, Community Members, Academics, Artisans, Singers, Musicians, Songwriters, Dancers from First Nations Communities around the World... All of Us coming together to share our Knowledge, our Experiences, Our Yarns, Our Stories, Our Songs, Our Dances...It is a fantastic opportunity for everyone who genuinely want to learn about World First Nations Peoples, this is your opportunity to come and sit with us...All Welcome!!!  


See below, some of our Deadly Presenters;

Keynote Presenter: Professor Gracelyn Smallwood


Biography: Professor Smallwood is of Birrigubba & South Sea Islander ancestral heritage with a long affiliation and close Family ties with the Torres Strait Islander Community and in Torres Strait Islander Traditional Lore and Culture. Her Aboriginal name is Gulligali meaning Sea Gull. She has been a tireless advocate for human rights, social justice, autonomy and self-determination for First Nations Australians spanning over 40 years. Since qualifying as a registered nurse in the early 1970’s Gracelyn has been an advocate for improved outcomes in Indigenous Health and Wellbeing in all sectors of society. Over the years Gracelyn served as Special Advisor on Aboriginal Health to the State and Federal Health Ministers.


In 1986, Gracelyn was awarded Queensland Aboriginal of the Year, in 1992, an Order of Australia medal for service to public health, particularly HIV-AIDS education; and in 1994 was the first woman, Indigenous person and non-paediatrician to receive the Henry Kemp Memorial Award at the International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Forum.


Gracelyn has championed the improvement of health, in particular Health and HIV – Aids prevention and has gained national and international recognition in both mainstream and cultural public health spheres. Gracelyn’s advocacy work has taken her nationally and around the Globe to Mongolia, Beijing, New Zealand, Arizona, Hawaii and South Africa just to name a few. In 1997, one of the highlights of her long career was when she was invited to South Africa by President Nelson Mandela and conducted a series of lectures on HIV-AIDS.


Professor Gracelyn Smallwood was awarded a PhD at the James Cook University in 2012. Her Thesis titled “Human rights and first Australians’ well-being has gained a ground swell of interests from around the globe, again a clear example of Gracelyn’s tireless efforts to bring to the forefront the human rights, social justice and well-being of her People on an international level. Gracelyn recently published her PhD Thesis into a book through Routledge Publications titled 'Indigenist Critical Realism: Human Rights and First Australians' well-being'

Special Guest Speaker; Merepaea Manukau, Strategic Relationship Manager Maori, New Zealand Qualification Authority (NZQA)


Biography: Merepaea Manukau hails from Ngā Puhi, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Toa and Waikato Tainui tribes. She brings with her a wealth of 20 years of experience specifically from the education sector spanning the early childhood to tertiary sector.


Merepaea is passionate about the development and advancement of Mātauranga Māori. She wholeheartedly believes that a strong cultural identify shapes and informs life-long learners and contributors to the education sector on the whole and is driven by improving outcomes for Māori learners and seeing people reach their full potential in life. 

Merepaea is currently a Strategic Relationship Manager Māori at New Zealand Qualification Authority (NZQA).  She is responsible for leading the development of a Mātauranga Māori quality assurance framework that is integrated within the quality assurance division of NZQA.


Abstract: In Applying Mātauranga Māori as business as usual - A Crown Agency Approach –  Te Hono o Te Kahurangi is the name of the whare that uses a unique whare ako framework to bring together Mātauranga Māori and Evaluative Quality Assurance (MM EQA) into one seamless approach. 


It assesses how well, and to what extent, education providers are contributing to education outcomes of ākonga, whānau, hapū, iwi, and where relevant, hapori Māori.  Māori tertiary sector representatives and the New Zealand Qualification Authority (NZQA) launched the initial approach in 2012 representing significant points of difference in how NZQA would proceed to quality assure qualifications, programmes, and providers privileging Mātauranga Māori in education outcomes.


Three years later, NZQA and Māori tertiary sector representatives reviewed the progress of the initial approach.  This presentation discusses the findings of that review, the extended scope of the updated approach, and how NZQA, as a result of that review, has since positioned in-house cultural capacity and capability to quality assure qualifications, programmes and providers privileging Mātauranga Māori in education outcomes.


Keynote Presenter: Mr Eilif T. Norvang, Mental Health Social Worker / CEO Family Guidance Clinic, Karasjok, Norway 


Biography: Eilif Norvang is of the Sami First Nations People of Norway, he completed a Masters Degree in Social Work at the Bodø University College, Department of Social Sciences in 2009.


Eilif specialises in children and youth psychiatry and family therapy. His professional career was formed through his extensive work in the social welfare offices, child and youth psychiatric clinic and a family guidance clinic, which he has been the Managing Director since 1991.


Eilif’s Masters research was conducted in Norway and Brisbane, Australia. His Masters Research was based around the theme; “Because they never ask”. “How do therapists in the psychiatric field integrate peoples’ traditional comprehension and explanations about psychiatric diseases in their therapies? Examples from two indigenous societies - from a Sami and an Aboriginal society. A comparative study”.


In Norway the project was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Data Service, and in Australia he was a visiting Scholar and based at the University of Queensland, School of Social Work and Applied Human Services. The project was also approved by The Inala Elders, The Brisbane Elders and The North Stradbroke Island Elders. Eilif conducted his interviews in Brisbane in 2004 and 2005.


From Eilif’s own words; (edited by Noritta)
As a professional social worker and therapist, I have met people who explain their psychiatric disease by telling me stories quite different from what specialists in psychiatry use to diagnose their patients.  I got interested in these stories and this way of explaining their suffering, or this way of thinking about psychiatry, - a way of thinking I recognized from my own Sami background. Examples of such explanations or content of the stories from the Sami society are “biadat” (that the disease is put on you by something or by someone) or “lonuhusat” (you are exchanged by the small people).


This way of thinking has consequences for the mental situation for the client/patient, - but can be hidden from the professionals. I think that knowledge and respect for the Indigenous way of thinking about psychiatric disease can be very helpful to us as professionals, it will certainly help us to be more understanding to our patients.

Special Guest Presenter: Birth Name - Pamela White

Spirit Name - Dinnawhan (Old Women -emu) 


Biography: Mother Enid White (nee Bligh) (Indigenous)

Grandfather - Herbert (Jock) Bligh Wakka (Burnett River) Kabi (Mary River)

Grandmother - Ida Bligh (nee Rigby) Gunggari, (Balone River, St George) Mandanjandi, Kamilaroi

Father - John (Jack Gunn) non-Indigenous

Grandfather - Joe Gunn  

Grandmother - Minnie Gunn (Sydney)

Residing - Maleny Through native title is now Jinaburra Country, I am Wakka - Kabi - Gunggari - Mandanjandi - Kamilaroi

I am who I am because of my Ancestors that walked before me leaving their essence in footprints along our Songlines.  I believe that my spiritual journey never began because it always was.  We were born with a soul spirit and consciousness, thus we have alwyas been spiritual beings.  To feel otherwise allows a conditioned belief that we are separate, and disconnects our pure source energy from the Creator.


I am of Sovereign nature and have three sons, decendants of the Wirrudjuri country in NSW and Torres Strait Islands.  

I am a volunteer and guide at Mary Cairn Cross nature reserve Maleny and Maleny Neighborhood Centre.  My Divine purpose is to Restore and Strengthen our Relationships, Communication, Connection with ourselves and the Law the exists within Nature.

Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Aunty Rose Elu | Cultural Educator | Community Elder, Brisbane, Queensland.


Biography: Aunty Rose Elu was born on Saibai Island top western Torres Strait. Father side Chieftain Clan, (Saibai Koedal ) Mother (Thabu Clan). Her family moved from Saibai Island in the late 1940's to the tip of Australia, the land was given to her family by the traditional owners currently known as SEISIA. Aunty Rose spent her childhood, primary & Secondary education at Bamaga.


Aunty Rose left to do further extended studies in Melbourne and lived there for 17 years. She later moved up to Brisbane to do academic studies at the University of Queensland. She has a BA double major in Anthropology & Political Science, Post graduate study at the University of Hawaii, including a PhD program on Customary Law. She holds a Diploma in Theology. Aunty Rose has been a Public Servant for over 20 years, working for various State Government Departments.


Aunty Rose is also a member in various Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, including Association of Social Anthropology in Oceania, Association of Education in the Pacific. She is a worldwide traveller and has presented various papers at the Forums and Universities throughout the world, most recently at United Nations on Climate Change. Aunty Rose also sits on various committees at the Anglican Church of Australia, Church Warden Anglican Non Geographic Parish, Diocese of Brisbane. Aunty Rose currently works for a not-for-profit organisation; namely Relationships Australia Queensland as a Counsellor and Indigenous Service Delivery Advisor.

Keynote Presenter: Dr Payi Linda Ford | Senior Research Fellow, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University


Biography: Dr Payi Linda Ford is a Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu woman from Kurrindju on the Finniss River, in the Northern Territory and is currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Northern Institute of Charles Darwin University, with whom she has a long association. Her knowledge, expertise and research in working with Indigenous groups is clearly invaluable to the Northern Institute. Dr Ford graduated with her PhD (Education) in 2006 from Deakin University. Dr Ford’s valuable expertise and knowledge stems from her lived experiences and informs her Indigenous Epistemological Practices and its application to her research projects. 


This in-depth understanding has enabled her to engage effectively with Aboriginal Peoples and Communities both locally and nationally. The Indigenist research methodologies are applied to her research projects such as the Indigenous Early Childhood Settings, Australian Research Council Indigenous Discovery Grant 2007 – 2011 and the Warruwi Aquaculture project and Plant Biosecurity research project. 


Before joining the Northern Institute, Payi was a Senior Lecturer at the University of Queensland, and based in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit. Her contribution to the learning and teaching curriculum at the University of Queensland earned the respect and admiration of both her students and colleagues alike, clearly demonstrating Payi Linda’s unique ability to successfully apply Indigenous Knowledge into the western academic paradigm.


As a Mother, Academic, Researcher, Cross-Cultural Educator, and Practitioner of Indigenous Traditions, Payi Linda Ford possesses a unique insight and rare understanding of Traditional Knowledge from her Rak Mak Mak Marranunggu Peoples’ ways of knowing and being all of which has enhanced her work in research and within the mainstream academic paradigm.


Special Guest Speaker Elders Panel: Aunty Edna Billy, Artisan, Cultural Educator, Traditional Dancer & Community Elder


Biography: Aunty Edna Billy was born and raised on Masig Island (Teardrop) in the Central Torres Strait. She is of the Kulkalgal Nation with Ancestral lineage to Aboriginal People through her Ancestor, King Mourie from Nagi Island who came to the Torres Strait from Mainland Australia. She is also of South Sea Islands and Papua New Guinean Heritage, with Family ties to Poruma Island through her Grandmother’s lineage.

Aunty Edna Billy was a School Teacher and taught Kindy and Primary education on Masig, Poruma and Yam Island in the Central Torres Strait. She completed her education at the Kedron Park Teachers College in Brisbane.

Keynote Presenter: Whaea Te Raina Atareta Ferris, Kurawaka Retreat Centre.


Biography: Te Raina Atareta Ferris, nee Sciascia is a Maori woman of the Ngati Kahungunu, Ngati Raukawa and Ngai Tahu tribes of Aotearoa.  She resides in her Kahungunu homelands and is a Kaitiaki (guardian or keeper) of the sacred art of Karanga for her people.  She is an educational advisor for many tribles in the art of Karanga, having taught this ancient tradition throughout New Zealand and overseas.  Te Raina has worked in Senior Academic positions since 1993, she has designed and taught programs in Maori Universities and is now a self-employed cultural advisor, working with her husband Romaine.


Te Raina is a teacher, a healer, a singer, an advisor, she is gifted with many talents and skills.  She is a great-grandmother of 2, grandmother of 17 and mother of 4, she has been married for 45 years to Romaine and enjoys living on her home lands where she and her husband have created a spiritual healing sanctuary called Kurawaka Retreat Centre, where, together they run programs of wellness and spiritual enlightenment and education.  She works mainly with women, but has ventured out into the field of men this year, empowering them and encouraging them to take hold of their lives and to discover the inherent cultural values and philosophies within.


Te Raina works with the feminine divine energy of the goddess, she re-awakens that energy within her own Maori cultural world view, bringing fresh knowing of the sacred feminine within.  She also sits on the World Council of Grandmothers and was instrumental in starting the Aotearoa Grandmothers Circle.  Our Culture is in our blood, re-connecting to the inherent DNA strands that run through our blood is critical to our survival as Indigenous, First Nations Peoples of the World.  Kia kaha tatau.

Special Guest Presenter: Michael Connolly,   Director/Owner of Dreamtime Kullilla-Art, Clontarf, Queensland. 


Biography: Michael Connolly is an Aboriginal from Charleville, south west Queensland and a descendant of the Kullilla Tribe from the Thargomindah and Eulo region on his Father's side and from the Muruwari People from Goodooga and Brewarrina region of north-west New South Wales on his Mother's side who can trace their traditional trade and diplomatic links with Central Desert as well as South Australian and Northern New South Wales' Aboriginal Communities. With this rich Indigenous background and a unique way of interpreting his cultural heritage Michael is able to represent a unique perspective in the visual and performing arts that informs his significant work in cross cultural contexts.


Michael is an enthusiastic and highly motivated professional Aboriginal artist and craftsman with excellent people skills and has worked extensively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, business associates and stakeholders, and the general public throughout Australia.


Michael’s career has progressed from an individual Aboriginal artist and performer in Brisbane, Queensland, to focusing on personal and business development for Dreamtime Kullilla-Art to being now recognised as a renowned Aboriginal artist and craftsman, performer and facilitator. Michael is dedicated to improving his business whilst also promoting and raising awareness of Aboriginal culture and its people out of his respect for the deep richness of diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories in Australia.


His international experience as an Indigenous Australian Ambassador in a range of countries including Brunei, India, Malta, Singapore, Switzerland, China and Hong Kong, demonstrate his ability to promote and deliver Aboriginal culture and to work independently and responsibly in many cross-cultural environments. Playing didgeridoo and performing in other countries has been one of the highlights of Michael’s career to date. Michael shares his time between art, cross-cultural training, consultancy and mentoring and has been involved in assisting remote Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory to become more self sufficient in such areas as tourism, land management and market gardening.


Michael was a former member of the Advisory Panel of the National Indigenous Men’s Forum which consulted with State and Federal Leaders about issues relating to Aboriginal Culture and Communities. As a Traditional Owner he was the former Cultural Heritage Director of the Kullilli Bulloo River Aboriginal Corporation in south west Queensland - recently resigned from.


In 2008 Michael was the recipient of the Distinguished Services Award – Community Service for an Individual during the South East Queensland NAIDOC Celebrations and he has received a Special Acknowledgment from the Queensland Department of Immigration, Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs for his initiative of the Aboriginal Australia Numberplates.


As a Graduate of the Australian Indigenous Leadership Centre and the National Indigenous Leadership Program (FaCSIA) Michael has added to his skill base and is recognised as an inspiring, entertaining and knowledgeable Facilitator and Trainer. He was immensely proud to be nominated for the Moreton Bay Regional Council Citizen of the Year on Australia Day 2014.


His involvement with all aspects of Indigenous Culture and capacity building include his activities for QCAN’s Numbarlie Marlu, Aboriginal Men’s Support Team, the South East Queensland Indigenous Chamber of Commerce, Redcliffe City Chamber of Commerce, the National Congress of Australia’s First Peoples and the Redcliffe Branch of Rotary International.


As an accomplished didgeridoo player and performer Michael has been invited to perform for the High Commissioner in Brunei, Worldwide Aussie Convention in Brisbane for the Northern Territory Tourist Commission and for the President of Ireland at the Brisbane Convention Centre.  He has also recorded a CD with the Queensland Irish Pipe Band which was a very personal and important acknowledgment of his Irish and Aboriginal heritage. He has been invited to perform at many functions and events including playing with the Maltese National Orchestra in Malta for their 40th anniversary of Independence Day Concert, the Mumbai [Bombay] International Film Festival as part of AusArts India and the launch of the Australia International Cultural Council in Kolkata [Calcutta].  He was invited by the Discovery Channel in Singapore to play didgeridoo for the launch of the new Discovery Atlas Channel which was showcasing Australia and, with his two children, delivered a major set of Cultural Performances at the St Gallen Tourist Expo, Switzerland where Australia was the featured international destination.  


Michael has been engaged as a Cultural Consultant, Trainer and Mentor with many Queensland and National organisations including the National U/19 Indigenous Youth Soccer Team, the Australian Indigenous Boxing Team, the Queensland Indigenous Youth Cricket Team, the Australian Indigenous Touch Football Team (Men and Women), Kurbingui Sporting Association, Murriajabree Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Association, Redcliffe Area Youth Space and Grace Lutheran College. Many of these are ongoing and repeat engagements attesting to the skilful meeting of client expectations.


Commencing in May 1996 Michael has worked full time as Director/Owner of Dreamtime Kullilla-Art which includes the roles of Aboriginal Artist/Craftsman, Didgeridoo Performer, Indigenous Business Consultant and Cultural Educator and Trainer.


As a Prescribed Service Supplier with Indigenous Business Australia, Michael specialises in Indigenous business, motivation, leadership, visual and performing arts, cultural education and workshops.


As an Indigenous Business Consultant Michael specialises in Indigenous business, motivation, leadership, visual and performing arts, cultural education and workshops


And as an Indigenous Business Skills Mentor Michael specialises in the delivery of small business solutions by providing advice and business expertise to Indigenous customers and guidance through the various Small Business course competencies (AQTF Standards).


Michael has extensive experience working and negotiating with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities and organisations in a culturally appropriate, respectful and responsive manner that is attentive to cultural protocols. He has a sound knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures, including traditional and contemporary perspectives, and an awareness of issues that impact upon communities.


Michael uses the artist name of Munda-gutta Kulliwari which means ‘you know me before you see me’.



More information on Dreamtime Kullilla-Art can be found at:

http://www.kullillaart.com.au/

Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Uncle Thomas Sebasio | Chairperson, Keriba Mabaigal Torres Strait Islander Corporation


Biography: Uncle Thomas is a Torres Strait Islander Elder from Erub (Darnley Island), and one of two Torres Strait Islander representatives on Griffith University’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Advisory Committee.

Before he retired, Uncle Thomas was a long-standing employee of the Brisbane City Council Water Supply Department, recognised through a Council Award for 40 years meritorious service and an Equity Award for initiating measures to facilitate the employment and support for Indigenous Australians. He is also the recipient of the Lord Mayors Award for Excellence in recognition of his work achievements with the Water Network (1998-99) and a NAIDOC Award for distinguished work service in 2003.


Uncle Thomas is passionate about the preservation and promotion of the history and cultural heritage of Torres Strait Islander Peoples. This is demonstrated by his position of President, Keriba Mabaigal Torres Strait Islander Corporation for Culture and Heritage. Also demonstrated in his passion to preserve the Torres Strait Islander Culture is his membership of the Advisory Board of the State Library of Queensland, and his affiliation with the Curator, Queensland Museum (specifically in relation to the oceanic archaeology of the Torres Strait) and his cultural leadership in a number of other advisory, community and government agency roles. All of this speaks volumes about Uncle Thomas’ tireless work for the betterment of his People and Community.


Uncle Thomas is currently one of the Griffith University’s Council of Elders; giving advice and guidance to Griffith University’s goals and strategies in terms of the successful retention and education of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. He is the current President / Chairperson of Keriba Mabaigal Torres Strait Islander Corporation.


Keynote Presenter: Darlene P. Auger (Pîtâpan, Kihiwîkwan Iswew) A Woodland Cree & Saulteaux woman originally from Wabasca (Wâpiskâw), Alberta, Canada;


Biography: Darlene is a mother of two young ladies, Fawn and Kîsîtin. Darlene is an educator, researcher, entrepreneur, holistic practitioner, actress, singer, a published researcher and an accomplished facilitator, having presented locally, nationally and abroad. Darlene is able to speak, read and write (Roman Orthography and Syllabics) in her Cree language and along with several other Cree women, recently recorded a CD of Cree Lullabies, titled: Cree Women in Lullaby.


Darlene is well known for her work in utilizing a “swing” for healing, based on a traditional Cree parenting practice for nurturing infants. She has coined “wîpîp’son” as an Indigenous form of therapy, in commitment to a spiritual vision she had in 2001. Darlene is currently pursuing her Doctorate at the University nuhelot’įne thaiyots’į nistameyimâkanak Blue Quills in Indigenous Life Knowledge – “lyiniw Pimâtisiwin Kiskeyihtamowin”.


Her research looks at the importance of ‘visioning” in Cree culture, as a “Right of Passage” that provides one with a great sense of purpose in living out their vision within community; thereby gifting others and contributing to community efficacy and harmony.




Abstract:  The Vision of Wiwipison: Can Knowledge be passed from Spirit World through a Vision to remind us of our traditional ways of being and knowing, for community wellbeing, harmony and efficacy?


The forced assimilation of Indigenous children into the Indian Residential School (IRS) System with Canada is now a shameful truth that is at the forefront of our minds.  Through the court ordered mandate of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, Indigenous and non-Indigenous people alike, the young and the old, are all listening and learning about Canada's true history.  Besides the great loss of culture and language, the IRS system eradicated traditional 'Rights of Passage" ceremonies and parenting practices that has been passed down through the generations for hundreds and hundreds of years before colonization.  These core values and systems once harvested healthy, strong Nations that conscientiously lived in harmony with nature.  However, children in IRS were institutionalized not parented, not loved, not nurtured nor honored and so they in turn did not parent or love their children.  In order to right the wrong, we must go back to our own way of knowing and doing.


In the fall of 2001, I received a spiritual vision in a traditional Cree peace pipe ceremony in a tipi.  I was shown a large hammock like cradle swing and was told by a spiritual grandmother that "the people need to be swung".  Since the fall of 2002, after much reflection, seeking clarity and validation from Cree Elders, I built a large swing, like the one I envisioned and I started to "swing the people" - I was living out my "vision". I have been doing this now for nearly 15 years and hundreds of people, who have had the experience of "swinging" have offered their amazing testimonies of healing and knowing.  People from all across Canada and abroad have accepted and welcomed this ancient yet new form of therapy, especially those who were in the IRS system.


I believe I mush search, analyze and synthesize this experience in order to leave behind this sacred bundle for our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.  This "vision" is a gift for the future.


The objective of my research is to uncover a traditional Indigenous Knowledge acquisition method, ie: VISIONING, in order to begin to recreate a semblance of community efficacy within our Indigenous Nations.  In living out our VISIONS, we will remember our "Rights of Passage" ceremonies, our parenting practices and our philosophies. The advancement of Indigenous Knowledge and practice for our future generations is vital to our survival and wellbeing.  Due to the near genocide of Canada's Indigenous population, it is imperative that we, Indigenous scholars, contribute to the global literacy cache, our own Knowledge.

Keynote Presenter: Dr Otrude Nontobeko Moyo University of Michigan - Flint, United States of America.


Biography:  My name is Otrude Nontobeko Moyo. I belong to the Ndebele ethnic group and my ancestors on my fathers side belonged to Mnyayi tribal group. I originally come from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. I currently teach at the University of Michigan- Flint in the USA. My work has focused on indigenous knowledge particularly, Ubuntu as a way of rehumanizing the dehumanizing, Africa and African Diaspora, social and environmental justice.

Submitted by: Dr. Otrude Nontobeko Moyo 


The presentation is from the heart – with poems in my language: Ndebele. Presentation Title: Humanizing the racialized self and community through Ubuntu: Critical insights from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe and Fort Beaufort, Eastern Cape South Africa 


Abstract: This presentation shares how Ubuntu, African way of life, as part indigenous knowledge is used by individuals, in community, in social meaning making, in self-identity by individuals and communities that have historically experienced racialization and dehumanization. First, the presentation considers an overview of academic discourses on Indigenous Knowledge in Southern Africa. Second, using narratives from people’s experiences the presentation shares comparative insights from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe and Fort Beaufort, Eastern Cape- South Africa, two societies attempting humanization through Ubuntu. South Africa where Ubuntu has been affirmed in national discourse and Zimbabwe, where it has been informally present. Narratives highlight how Ubuntu is used individually and collectively to facilitating the moving away from and/or succumbing to damaging effects of racialization and oppressions by affirming humanity more than the racialized essence, collective acknowledgement of trauma and healing, moving away from living victimhood. The presentation shares Ubuntu practices that affirm humanization. 

Special Guest Speaker, Conference Dinner: Danny Morseu, Olympian Basketballer - 1980 Moscow & 1984 Los Angeles | Director, National Indigenous Basketball Academy


Biography: Danny Morseu is of the Dauareb Clan of the Meriam Nation & the Wagadagam Clan of Mabuiag Island with family ties to Erub Island in the Eastern Torres Strait. He was born on Thursday Island and spent his childhood in Tamwoy Town, a mission at the back on Thursday Island, where he grew up without running water or electricity. He started playing basketball at school and developed his career in the National Basketball League.


Danny attracted the attention of National Basketball League Coach Brian Kerle after playing a match against Kerle’s club, the Melbourne-based St. Kilda Saints on tour in Queensland. Kerle convinced Danny to move to Melbourne in 1978, where he played in the St. Kilda’s championship winning teams of 1979 and 1980.


Danny played 217 NBL games in total, winning another NBL championship with the Brisbane Bullets in 1987. Danny played for the Australian team at the 1980 Olympics in Moscow and at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. He was the first Torres Strait Islander to represent Australia at the Olympic Games. He also played twelve world cup matches for Australia and was inducted into the NBL Hall of Fame in Canberra, Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney. Danny Morseu has been instrumental in the induction of many young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in basketball on a local, national and international level. Patrick Mills and Nathan Jawai are just a couple of his success stories.


Danny is currently the Director of the National Indigenous Basketball Academy, their mission is to achieve “Excellence, Healthy Lifestyles, Economic Opportunity, Cultural Recognition and National Pride” He is actively involved in mentorship and supporting young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Basketballers to achieve their goals, vision and dreams. 



Presenter Plenary Session & Elders Panel: Dr Lilla Watson, Community Elder, Artist, Educator, Philosopher, Aboriginal Political Activist & Human Rights Campaigner…Co-Founder of the BlackCard Pty. Ltd.


Biography: Aunty Lilla holds a wealth of knowledge on Aboriginal education, knowledge and culture. Dedicating her career to educating others, both on national and international platforms.

Aunty Lilla holds a Bachelor of Arts, and has contributed greatly to the world of academia, publishing a host of papers on Indigenous issues and being a key note speaker at several monumental events including – the National Conference on Higher Education, the International Feminism: Towards 2000 Conference and the Anti-Discrimination Commissions’ and the ‘Co-operation out of Conflict’ conference. Aunty Lilla has worked across the country, with several universities, as a visiting fellow lecturer.  


Her essential work in Aboriginal studies, also prompted an honourable invite for her to present her academic paper at the World Conference of Indigenous Peoples' Education in Canada.  

Aunty Lilla has developed and taught core university subjects such as 'Aboriginal Perspectives' for the University of Queensland, and in partnership with Aunty Mary Graham, developed 'Aboriginal Approaches to knowledge'.  Aunty Lilla was instrumental in the development of the renowned LinkUp agency, tasked with the responsibility of reuniting Stolen Generation Children. She has been an advocate and supporter for the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, Tribal Council and several Murri youth programs.  


Aunty Lilla has also provided dedicated support to Woodford Prison, teaching and counselling Murri prisoners, as well as serving as a member of the Parole Board for Corrective Services.  Aunty Lilla has also devoted her time to serving on other boards including: The Queensland Art Gallery, The Senate of Queensland University and the Board of the State Library. Dr Lilla Watson was recently awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane.  

Presenter Plenary Session & Elders Panel: Dr Mary Graham, Educator, Philosopher, Writer, Human Rights Campaigner, Associate Adjunct Professor (UQ) and Doctor of the University (QUT)


Biography: Dr Graham grew up in South-East Queensland, and is a Kombu-merri person through her father’s heritage and a Wakka Wakka clan through her mother’s heritage.  With a career spanning more than 30 years, Mary has worked across several government agencies, community organisations and universities including:  Department of Community Services, Aboriginal and Islander Childcare Agency, the University of Queensland and the Foundation for Aboriginal and Islander Research Action.


In 1992 Dr Mary Graham also served as the Commissioner for Queensland Corrective Services.Mary has been a dedicated lecturer with the University of Queensland, teaching Aboriginal history, politics and comparative philosophy.  Mary has also lectured nationally on these subjects, and developed and implemented the core university subjects of ‘Aboriginal Perspective’s’, ‘Aboriginal Approaches to Knowledge’ and at the post-graduation level ‘Aboriginal Politics’.


Dr Graham has written and published many prominent works, including – publications in the Aboriginal Encyclopaedia, training modules for Cross Cultural Awareness and a host of academic papers.  Mary has worked extensively for the Foundation for Aboriginal and Islander Research Action, as a Native Title Researcher and was also a Regional Counsellor for the former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission.

Mary has worked on scripts for Murriimage and executively produced the documentaries ‘Same place, my home’ and ‘Makin’ Tracks’.  


Dr Mary Graham is a proud member of the Ethics Council for the National Congress of Australia’s First Nations and for the past two years she has been teaching across the country with The BlackCard. In 2015 Mary was appointed Associate Adjunct Professor (POLSIS) at UQ and was awarded an Honourary Doctorate at QUT for her lifetime committment to Scholarship and Community.

Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Terry Williams | Community Elder, Brisbane.


Biography: Uncle Terry is of the Gangalu and Goreng Goreng tribes with links to the Yimen tribe. He is from a family of ten siblings. He has been married for forty years with four children, two daughters-in-law and three grandchildren.

His life work has been to empower his family and his community, towards a wholesome wellbeing and lifestyle. He has worked tirelessly in the areas of community engagement, consultancy and advocacy for men’s health and social well-being is his heartfelt desire.

He is currently working for the Institute of Urban Indigenous Health on the Closing the Gap team and he is the Patient Care Coordinator. 


He has a Diploma in Community Services, a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment and a Trade Certificate in French Polishing.

In the past, he was an Indigenous Affairs Advisor and has vast experience and knowledge in the areas of; Community Engagement with Indigenous Traditional Owners, Job Support Agencies and Training Groups. He was also a Cultural Awareness Program Facilitator and in Employment and Training, and Tender Writing for community projects. Uncle Terry worked as a Health Worker in Queensland Health providing an outreach service into the community, clients homes, local schools, health services, Indigenous and government organisations.

He was also an Elder in the Murri Court and sat with Magistrates and Indigenous Elders at the Youth Murri Court, Cultural Awareness and Living Strong Facilitator and was the Coordinator of the Pit Stop Male Health Screening Program. He was an Official Visitor with the Queensland Corrective Services and is a Small Business Owner – Furniture Polishing and Restoration.


Keynote Presenter: Dr Gregory Phillips | Executive Director, Abstarr Consulting


Biography: Dr Gregory Phillips is from the Waanyi and Jaru Peoples, and comes from Cloncurry and Mount Isa. He is a Medical Anthropologist, has a PhD in psychology (‘Dancing With Power: Aboriginal Health, Cultural Safety and Medical Education’), and a research master’s degree in medical science (‘Addictions and Healing in Aboriginal Country’, published as a book in 2003).


Gregory has twenty years work experience in healing, alcohol and other drugs, youth empowerment, medical education and health workforce. He developed an accredited Indigenous Health curriculum for all medical schools in Australia and New Zealand, founded the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, and co-wrote a national Indigenous health workforce strategy. He established the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation Ltd in the wake of the federal apology to Indigenous Australians, has advised federal ministers on Indigenous health inequality, and was honoured in 2011 with an ADC Australian Leadership Forum Award.

Gregory is currently Executive Director of ABSTARR Consulting.



Special Guest Speaker: Ms Rachel Petero Founder of GENVIVA, RP Enterprise & Investment Ltd, Women Leading Change Qatar and Rise 2025 (#rise2025)


Biography: Rachel is a global entrepreneur firmly rooted in her rich Māori heritage which has led her back to Aotearoa (New Zealand) after 15 years abroad (2001 - 2015). Ngāti Tamaoho me Ngāti Whawhakia (father) and Ngāti Tahinga me Ngāti Te Ata (mother) are her Waikato-Tainui tribal affiliations.  Founder of RP Enterprise Group & Investment Ltd, Women Leading Change Qatar and Rise 2025 (#rise2025). Rachel gained her UK CIPD HR qualification and ICF ACC credentials abroad and is a proud Board member of Kiwa-Middle East in Abu Dhabi and Advisory Board member of Global Angels Foundation. In 2015 she was nominated as a member of Global Women in Aotearoa and in 2016 took on the Leadership Development Director contract for their flagship Breakthrough Leadership programme.


"Developing purposeful leaders who then RISE to empower many" is the vision statement Rachel aligns her life's work to. Aligned to the UN's Global Goals 4 & 5 the launch of #rise2025 coaching and leadership for indigenous women in December 2015 is the beginning of a 10 year strategy which starts in Aotearoa. By 2025 100,000 indigenous women and girls will be positively impacted by #rise2025 globally. Find out more via rise2025.com


Rachel received a World of Difference award from TIAW - The International Alliance for Women in Washington DC for her work with Qatari women in leadership. As a business mentor for the Cherie Blair Foundation in the UK and International keynote speaker she combines her business and love of travel wherever possible. Married to John of Rarotongan, Tongan and Niue background they have six nieces and nephews all following their passion and thriving in this global economy.

LinkedIn - https://qa.linkedin.com/in/rachelpetero



Special Guest Speaker: Ms Wendy Watego, National Program Director, Stars Leadership Institute, Brisbane


Biography: Wendy's Mother's Mob are Goenpil, Nughie, Noonuccal People from Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and Moorgumpin (Moreton Island) - which is part of the Aboriginal Nation of Quandamooka commonly known as Moreton Bay, off the coast of South East Queensland.  Her Dad's family have Ancestral ties to Bundjalung Nation and are proud South Sea Islanders from Mare Island in New Caledonia.


After graduating as teacher in 1989, Wendy began her professional life as a pre-school educator.  Her career quickly grew as she took up a variety of educational leadership positions throughout Queensland, the Northern Territory and Torres Strait Islander Standing Committee of the Queensland Teachers Union.  She believes that this position, along with being the first Black woman to be acting principal of Bwgcolman Community School on Palm Island, has been a big influence driving her dedication to the empowerment and transformation of First Nations communities.

After having her first son Lawson, Wendy left the education sytem to establish a private coaching practice specialising in healing from inter-generational loss, grief and trauma and transformational leadership.

After a fortuitous meeting with Vicki Scott at an Indigenous Women's Leadership Conference they realised their common vision of empowering individuals - especially First Nations People's - and together in 2008 formed STARS Institute of Learning and Leadership and in 2014 authored their first book Out Of The Box Thinking On Indigenous Leadership Simple Strategies to Create An Empowering Future.  As National Program Director for STARS Institute, Wendy designs and delivers the STARS Programs and they are mind blowing.  The programs are dynamic and you literally shift your thinking and your life out of the box of limitations and into the world of what is possible.  Wendy says that in this role:  "What makes my heart sing and my spirit dance is empowering people to complete their unfinished business and heal from the constraints of the past, to unlock thier cultural codes from within thier DNA, tap into the true leadership genius and achieve the kinds of results that make a real difference to their lives, the lives of thier families and to the lives of their communities". 

Wendy is "blissfully married" to her childhood sweetheart Ken, and the mother of two sons, Lawson and Archie.  They live on her Ancestral Quandamooka Country in Queensland, Australia for more information please visit http://www.starsleadershipinstitute.com
Special Guest Speaker Stephen Corporal BSoc Wk, BA (Psych), Prof Cert IR, MSocPol, Senior Lecturer / PhD Candidate Griffith University, Justice of the Peace (Qual).

Biography: Stephen is an Eastern Arrente man with close family connections to many other First Nations People. He was born in Townsville and lives in Southeast Queensland. He was involved in counselling and welfare work in the Brisbane Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community for many years before completing his Bachelor of Social Work and Bachelor of Arts (Psychology) degrees at the University of Queensland in 2003.


As President of the Social Work Student Association (SWSA) he was announced the 2003 SBS Valedictorian for his work with Social Work students at the University of Queensland. In 2004-2005, he was the Indigenous Postgraduate Representative for James Cook University's Postgraduate Student Association and the IPLO on CAPA. Stephen was President of the Social Work Alumini at UQ from 2006-2007. He completed a Masters of Social Policy at James Cook University.


Stephen worked as the Senior Student Support Officer at the UQ Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit from 2005 to 2009 and also as the Indigenous Recruitment Manager at the University of Queensland School of Medicin until 2011. He is currently working at Griffith University where he is involved in researching, lecturing and supervising students. Stephen is a PhD Candidate; his PhD research topic is titled" Indigenous health workforce building: University Indigenous students and lecturers' interactions".

Keynote Elders Panel Member Reverend Alexandra Gater (Aunty Alex), Brisbane Elder | Founder Aboriginal Walkabout Ministry


Biography: Aunty Alex is a wife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother, she is a Wangan Jagalingou woman from the Alpha Clermont Area in Central Queensland and the Koa Clan from Winton from her Mother and her Mother’s father’s country is Kukkaimiji from Edward River, North Queensland. Aunty Alex’s grandfather on her father’s side was from Ireland and Scotland. She was born in Brisbane and raised in Cherbourg. Aunty Alex has 9 Children, 33 Grandchildren and 13 great grandchildren and two on the way. 


In 2005 she was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for her tireless work in human rights advocacy for her people in the prison system and in the grassroots Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. She is one of six women from Australia nominated from 1,000 women worldwide nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.  Aunty Alex was also nominated for the Australian of the Year Award in 2005 and received the South East Queensland NAIDOC Distinguished Services Award also in 2005. In 1997, Aunty Alex was ordained as a Deacon, and then she was ordained as a Priest in 2003 and became the first Aboriginal Woman in Queensland to be ordained as a Priest in the Anglican Church. Aunty Alex received distinguished Community Awards for her tireless grassroots work in the community, one of these awards came from the Department of Corrective Services.


She currently works on a local, National and International level as an advocate for social justice and human rights. For 23 years Aunty Alex has been working as a Chaplain in the Prisons around Brisbane, offering spiritual and cultural support to men and women in custody. Aunty Alex has supported many women, whose lives have been changed for the better. Many of these women suffer great disadvantage with problems such as domestic violence, poverty, desertion, and single parenting. She has also supported those mothers who have had their children removed from them by the Department of Child Safety. Her work with women spearheaded the establishment of her organisation called ‘Aboriginal Women for Change’, empowering women to take up the challenge, to take ownership of their lives, show leadership in gaining recognition, respect and equality for all women.

Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Reverend Jenny Thompson | BCW, BHS (Mental Health), CMACA


Biography:  Jenny Thompson is an Aboriginal/African American woman; her traditional Aboriginal links are with the Wakka Wakka People belonging to the Kabi Kabi language group of the South Burnett area.


Jenny is a mother of three children and ten grandchildren. She is an ordained Deacon of the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane and has a Bachelor Degree in Community Welfare and a Bachelor Degree in Health Science (Mental Health). Jenny has her own counselling and therapy practice, where she works with mainly children and adolescents. Jenny is a Spiritual Healer and a medical intuitive and uses these methods in her practice.


Her counselling and therapy practice covers, grief and loss, anger management, mental health, emotional release and play therapy. Jenny conducts many workshops and seminars in Indigenous cultural and spiritual methods of healing and connection. She has been doing this work for over twenty years.Much of Jenny's work has been with Indigenous women, their families; children and adolescence, she has done this for many years. Jenny also provided a counseling service for the Youth Detention Centre and Women's Correctional Centre.


Jenny worked as the Indigenous Consultant in the Mater Child and Youth Mental Health Service for over thirteen years. During this time she was a Director and Deputy Chair of Searchlight Inc's Hymba Yumba Community Hub. Jenny is one of the founding members of this Indigenous School.


Jenny has taught a case management course in the Indigenous Unit at the Kangaroo Point TAFE and mental health subjects for over four years and provides training on various counseling needs and case management within communities as well as running workshops for families and communities on social and emotional well-being. Jenny is trained also in emotional therapy, grief and loss counseling, play therapy, suicide intervention and sexual assault counseling. Through her private practice Jenny offers Individual and Family counseling, Professional Supervision, Spiritual & Ancestral Work, Cultural Intuitive Clearing and Cultural Body Work.


Jenny is the founding member of the Internal Reconciliation Program "Gin Murun Gari" and the Junjarina Wurithin Healing Centre.

Aunty Jenny is a respected Elder within the Aboriginal Communities she works in, as well as the wider communities.


Special Guest Speaker: Dr Vanessa Lee | Senior Lecturer, University of Sydney


Biography: Dr Vanessa Lee is a First Nations woman from Far North Queensland and the descendant of the Wik and Meriam Nations.


Dr Vanessa Lee is a Senior Lecturer within the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Sydney. She has recently been awarded her Doctorate in Medicine from Griffith University in Brisbane, Queensland.


As the first national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vice president of the Public Health Association of Australia, Vanessa is instrumental in ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ways of knowing and doing are placed in the forefront of policy development.


All of the research and advocacy that Vanessa is involved in are directed towards the overarching goal of improving the efficacy and linkages of services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.


Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel Aunty Valda Coolwell, Brisbane Elder


Biography: Aunty Valda is Gooreng Gooreng woman through her father’s linage. Her mother is a first generation South Sea Islander born in Australia. Her father came from Tanna Island in Vanuatu in the South Pacific. She spent most of her younger life living in Gooreng Gooreng Country from Bundaberg to Gladstone and that’s where she got her education. When she was at school, she was picked to go to play netball in Brisbane and had no billets. When she got to Brisbane, she was taken to the Salvation Army women’s home at South Brisbane. When she went to netball the next day, a girl from netball came and took her to go and stay with them. So she went and stayed there with them, she was 13 at the time. After finishing school, Aunty Valda couldn’t find a job in Gladstone so she left because she grew up very poor, she needed to go to work, so she ended up in Brisbane. She got the train down to Brisbane to look for work and stayed with her cousin. Aunty Valda went straight from school to working at the Mater Private for the Sisters of Mercy as a Pantry Maid. She met a lot of Murri girls there at the time and they became good friends with her and even some girls from Cherbourg who also became her good friends.


In Brisbane she met her husband and eventually married him and remained here in Brisbane. Have lived in Brisbane since she was 17 years old and lived nowhere else except for her home Country. Aunty Valda has 5 children; her husband was a hardworking man and was in the Malayan Campaign in a Peacekeeping Deployment, they were very poor. All the Murris around them, they all supported each other. She worked for the Golden Circle cannery at Northgate during the pineapple season and was excited to get her pay every day. She also worked for the South Brisbane Fish Board and then at the Saint. Andrews Hospital just before she got the call to go and work in the Post Master General based in Elizabeth Street, behind the main post office. Aunty Valda worked there for 20 years until she got made redundant. The computerised telecommunications came to the Edison Telephone exchange and they were the first ones to use computers in Queensland. When she finished work, after retirement, she joined a lot of Murri Orgs in Brisbane, she was part of the Board of Dundalli Youth Service and on the Board of the Brisbane Elders for six years .


She raised five children in Brisbane inner city area, in Milton and West End, always looking for a house. She is a grandmother with 9 Grandchildren, raised her eldest grandson. She does Acknowledgements to Country around Brisbane, she is an Elder with Queensland University of Technology, and provides advice and guidance about Aboriginal issues. She is also affiliated with the University of Queensland. Every week, she is actively involved in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community and the wider Australian Community. Aunty Valda's ongoing and tireless work continues as our Mentor and Leader in the Brisbane Community, providing assistance, guidance and support to countless, individuals, families, and organisations both in the grassroots community, and within government and non-government sectors.

Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Aunty Kathy Brown | Caboolture Elder


Biography: Aunty Kathy Brown was born in Burketown in Northwest Queensland, near Doomagee. She is of the Waanyi and, Kalkadoon Nation. Her Country stretches out right up to Lawn Hill mines. Aunty Kathy worked as a domestic Nurse for 32 years at the Winton hospital. Before this she worked at the Windemere Cattle Station at Winton for 2 years as a housemaid and nanny for the children of the Station Owner. She moved from Winton to Inala in 1964, and lived in Inala until 2004. 


In Inala, Aunty Kathy worked for 13 years at the Inala Serviceton South State School and was very happy to be there because she was also there for her children. After retiring from her job at the Inala Serviceton South State School, she moved up to the North Coast region with her husband. She lived on Bribie Island and Wamuran and has been living in Caboolture for the past 13 years. Aunty Kathy is a mother of four, grandmother of 13 and has 12 great grandchildren and 1 great great grandchild. Over the years, she has been a housewife, mother, grandmother and great grandmother and great great grandmother; always taking care of all of her children, her grandchildren and great grans and now her great great gran.


Although retired, Aunty Kathy has been actively involved in the Community on a number of Boards and Elder Groups. She is also a member of the Waminda Respite Centre where she is involved in the Centre's activities for the elderly. CentaCare Waminda was established in Ningi in 1997 to respond to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People in the Caboolture Shire. She is also involved with the Tullawong High School providing support and encouragement to Indigenous students to achieving results through Indigenous education, her great granddaughter is a student at this school.


Currently, Aunty Kathy is a member of the Caboolture Elders and is actively involved in the Caboolture Community, providing support to individuals and families. She is a senior member of the Caboolture Justice Group, assisting people whilst on probation and supporting those who come before the criminal justice system. Aunty Kathy also sits as an Elder on the Caboolture Murri Court and has been an Elder on the Murri Court for 5 years. She became a member of the Pamanyungan Elders Alliance Inc. in 2014 and received a Certificate of Appreciation for her tireless work and valuable contributions to the Community. Aunty Kathy is a pillar of strength in her family and community, always taking care of everyone and lending a helping hand to those who need it.


Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: 

Aunty Flo Watson OAM | Order of Australia for Services to the Indigenous Community of Queensland 


Biography: Aunty Flo Watson is a Traditional Owner and Elder fo the Ghunghanghi People of Yarrabah, North Queensland.  Also affiliates with the Kuku-yelangi People of Laura/Maytown, Palmer River area and the Wulguru Kaba people of Magnetic Island and Townsville. Her Traditional Name is Jinnadirran.  


Aunty Flo has had a long and varied career working across numerous public and private sectors, from government and non-government organisations , Universities, TAFE Colleges, grassroots Community Organisations as a Cultural Consultant, Mentor,  Public Servant, Community Development Worker, Trainer, Educator, just to name a few. Her vast work experiences has provided her with substantial skills, experiences and knowledge in working effectively with both Indigenous  and non-Indigenous communities and organisations.  


As an Indigenous person herself, Aunty Flo has successfully worked with clients and projects over the years within numerous Indigenous communities. Aunty Flo was the Principal Director of Jinnadirran Training & Consultancy Services Pty. Ltd, a Queensland Registered Company established in 1996.  Its purpose was to establish a business, which specialises in developing and delivering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cross Cultural Awareness training and culturally appropriate skills training courses for all interested participants and organisations and provides a cultural approach to consulting services working with Indigenous People. Jinnadirran worked in partnership with other Indigenous and non-Indigenous facilitators and consultants to promote self-determination for Indigenous Australians and to progress the process of reconciliation.  


In January 2015, Aunty Flo was awarded the Order of Australia Medal (OAM) for her tireless work and services to the Indigenous Community of Queensland. This highly prestigious Medal is a clear example of her ongoing dedication and commitment to her community. Aunty Flo is currently engaged in consultancy work for Aus Aid, Australian Indigenous South Sea Islander Association, Qld Performance Arts Centre, Qld Education, Save the Children Foundation, Indigenous Disability Network, the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts, and The Queensland State Library.





Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Aunty Rayleen Burns, 

Community Elder


Biography: Aunty Rayleen Burns was born in Brisbane and is a second generation stolen generation. Her mum was raised in the Cherbourg Girls Dormitory and lived in the Dormitory until she was 14 years of age and then she went to work as a domestic servant for a policeman in Hebel, near Dirranbandi, Southwest Queensland. Her mother met her dad there and they later married in Brisbane.  


Aunty Rayleen is the youngest of 10 kids, 5 sisters and 4 brothers, she has heaps of nieces and nephews.  Moved to Brisbane when she was 11, left school at grade 7 to start working in the Northgate Cannery and sewing clothes. She worked for 10 years in the factories.  She moved to Mt Isa for work at the Coles Store, and  was there for 2 years.  She then came back to Brisbane and met her husband, she has four children and is a grandmother to nine grannies and 3 great grans, the youngest is one. She did the usual housewife things, raising her kids and doing part-time work here and there.


She went to kangaroo Point TAFE in 1982 and 1983 and completed a Diploma in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Welfare.  She got a job with Centrelink in Human Resources, she was there for 9 years and 9 months and during that period she started her Degree in Social Work, studying part-time and graduating in 1992 with a Bachelor of Social Work at the University of Queensland, Faculty of Social Work and Social Policy.


After graduating from University of Queensland, she commenced work as at social worker in Aboriginal and Islander community Health Service in Hubert Street in Woolloongabba for 3 years and she then moved to Tennant Creek and worked in Aboriginal Health and then in Mental Health in Queensland Health in Cairns in the Child and Youth Mental Health Services in Cairns.  


From there she moved to Aboriginal Health service in Port Hedlands in WA. And she worked for the Royal Flying doctors services in Hopevale Aboriginal Community in North Queensland and from there she moved to Aboriginal Community Health in the Katherine NT and then from there to Alice Springs to the Central Australia, Aboriginal Congress Alcohol and Drug Program and a short period at the Aboriginal and Islander Institute of Indigenous Health (IUIH) in Morayfield and since then is retired.  Her Social Work Degree allowed her to travel the country and work in obscure and interesting places.  Furthermore, her work in Social Work has enabled her to travel to the World Indigenous Healing Our Spirit Conference on three occasions in Albuquerque USA, and Edmonton in Canada and in Hawaii. She also visited Tahiti and Thursday Island in the Torres Strait to learn about Torres Strait Islander culture.


Aunty Rayleen was a Board Member of Gallang Place, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counselling Services and she was also a Board Member of Winnam Housing Co-op, and on the Board of the National Stolen Generation Alliance. In her retirement, she is still travelling, she has just come back from Winton and Longreach, she comes home for a bit and then she’s off again to Uluru in June.  She is a quiet achiever and her life’s work has been in the areas of Social and Emotional Well-being in the grassroots Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community. A large majority of her work has been with Traditional People in the Remote Communities across Australia. This has been her passion.  Although retired, she is still actively involved in this work; addressing the social and emotional well-being in the community. Click on [email protected]


Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: 

Glenice Warinkil, |Woppaburra Elder 

| Community Elder, Brisbane.


Biography: Aunty Glenice (Barney) Croft, traditional Woppaburra name is Warinkil which means Crow Woman. She a Woppaburra and Community Elder. Her grandfather, her traditional ancestor, name Munquadum, a Dharanbul/Woppaburra man from the Keppel Islands. He was one of the last of her ancestors removed from his country in the early 1900’s. Firstly to cattle yards at Woodford, then Fraser Island and Cherbourg where he met and married her grandmother Bessie Blair and then settle in Urangan, Hervey Bay. There, they had two children, one of them was Aunty Glenice’s mother who met and married her father and she is one of twelve children. They never lost connection to their traditional land on Keppel Island. Woppaburra people now have a 99 year lease on five pieces of land on Great Keppel Island (Woppa) – granted in 2007.


Aunty Glenice’s house was a drop-in centre for people travelling through the area, relatives from Cherbourg, Yarrabah, Brisbane, from anywhere. Everyone always knew they could throw a swag down on their large verandah. Aunty Glenice’s childhood memories, growing up in Hervey Bay was both good and bad. Her good memories are of great fresh seafood, vegetable gardens, their own chickens and a pet goat, meat was a luxury. Her family life is something she is still dealing with today, but as a child one finds happiness in small things. Her bad memories are of blatant racial prejudice displayed as an acceptable option was unquestionable. You didn’t rock the boat, our feelings didn’t count. 


School days were a mixture of loving learning and being bullied in the playground. Her cultural knowledge came from listening to the old people talking in language, when we were not supposed to be listening. They still had the fear and mistrust of the white man, because of all the atrocities that they saw happen to their people before they were taken away from their country. Her curiosity and interest in her culture has been a living experience. She was given Knowledge from the Wise Ones and has passed this Knowledge on to her children. This knowledge and her life’s journey comes from all the people who walked with her and whose footsteps she followed and walked beside, this has been an ambition of hers to document and to put this Knowledge into a book, the process has begun.


She successfully completed the Associate Diploma in Social Sciences (Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Welfare) and completed one year Associate Diploma in Administration (Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Business) at the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit at the Kangaroo Point College of TAFE.


The successful completion of her course was due to her determination, commitment and appreciation of the chance to be involved in this new initiative to educate and re-educate Indigenous people in the environment they are comfortable in. Since the successful completion of her course at Kangaroo Point TAFE College, Aunty Glenice participated in further areas of education and professional development and has membership and involvement in numerous community organisations. She has been involved in a wide range of community work, and has received Distinguished Services Award for her services to the community. Aunty Glenice has been instrumental in the establishment of core organisations in Brisbane. Although Aunty Glenice retired at 70 years old in 2013, she is still actively involved in Community initiatives.


Special Guest Presenter Elders Panel: Millianna Davey | Artisan | Community Elder, Townsville, Queensland.


Biography: Aunty Millianna Davey heritage extends from mainland Australia to the Kulkalgal Nation & Dauareb Clan of the Meriam Nation with strong family ties to the Erubam Le and Ugaram Le of the Eastern Torres Strait. Aunty Millianna Davey was born on Ugar Island and grew up on Erub Island. She worked as a nurse at the Aplin Hostel on Thursday Island taking care of patients from the outer Islands visiting the Thursday Island General Hospital. She married at a young age and moved from Thursday Island to Marathon near Hughenden where her husband was a Railway Fettler. 

She also worked for the Queensland Railways as a Station Mistress at the Marathon Railway Station.

Aunty Millianna, currently resides in Townsville where she is actively involved in the local community as part of the Deadly Aunties, singing in the prison system for our men and women in custody. She also donates her time to cook Traditional Food for the Mental Health hospital and she is a Cultural Educator and Weaver, Storyteller; teaching her craft and sharing her stories with school children in Townsville School. Aunty Millianna was also an Elder in the Murri Court in Townsville supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, women and young people who come before the courts and criminal justice system.


As a Traditional Weaver, she loves showcasing her craftwork and is always seen at cultural events and festivities selling her wares with a smile and a story.

Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop, Managing Director, Malu Mai Wellness Consultancy Pty. Ltd.


Biography: Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop is a First Nations Australian woman originally from Tamwoy Town, Thursday Island in North Queensland. Her ancestral heritage extends from mainland Australia to the Kulkalgal Nation to the Erubam Le and Ugaram Le and to the Dauareb Clan of the Meriam Nation. She graduated from the School of Social Work and Social Policy in 1992 at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia Campus. 


Since that time Noritta has worked extensively in the grassroots Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and within non-Indigenous communities throughout the state of Queensland. The areas of her work include: grief & loss, bereavement counselling and support, criminal justice, prison rehabilitation, mental health, community development, cross-cultural education, social work and welfare education and training, drug and alcohol counselling, Indigenous health and human rights and social justice advocacy.


Noritta was awarded a PhD in Criminal Justice and Social Work at the University of Queensland in the School of Social Work and Human Services, St. Lucia Campus on the 22nd of July, 2010. She is a recipient of the UQ 2010 Dean’s Commendation for Outstanding Research and Higher Degree PhD thesis. Noritta is a 2011 Winston Churchill Fellow and a 2006 Australian Federation of University Women Fellow. She is a Co-Founder and current Board of Director of Gallang Place, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Counselling Services based in Brisbane. Noritta is the Founder and current Managing Director of Malu Mai Wellness Consultancy; a family owned company that is committed to addressing the social, emotional, cultural and spiritual well-being of individuals, families and communities on a local, national and international level.


Abstract: This year marks the 25th year since the Royal Commission Recommendations into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody...nothing much has changed since that time, our People are still highly represented in the prison and criminal justice system.  In her PhD thesis, Noritta describes this high incarceration rate of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People as an insidious form of genocide. In light of the current political situation regarding the over-representation and abuse of First Nations Australians in the prison and criminal justice system; Noritta's talk will highlight aspects of her PhD research which investigated the utilisation of Culture as Rehabilitation.  She will bring to the forefront the voices of our men and women in custody and some of their views on ways in which to address the high incarceration and recidivism rates, she will share some of the stories and experiences of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islanders and Maori Peoples with prison rehablitation programs and the impact on their journey from prison to community. 


CONFERENCE FUNDRAISING RAFFLE OF FIRST NATIONS ARTWORK 

As part of our conference fundraising, raffle tickets are now being sold for 2 Adult Gold Passes to see the Broncos v Storms Game at the Suncorp Stadium on Friday the 1st of July, 2016 at 7:45pm. 


Tickets are $5 each or 3 for $10...


** Tickets will be drawn on Saturday the 25th of June, 2016.


We have ticket sellers out there, if you want to purchase any tickets please call us on 0459 508 460 or email: [email protected] Thank you!!  

Hello Everyone, just letting you know that as part of our conference fundraising drive, we are raffling these authentically magnificent works of art by our First Nations Artists. Tickets are $5 each or 3 for $10.


The Aboriginal Artist who painted the Boomerang is young Jahmarley Dawson from Inala, he is Aunty Kathy Brown's Great Grandson, Aunty Kathy Brown is one of our speakers on the Elders Panel, scroll down here and you will find her story.  The Artist who painted the small boomerangs is Madeliane Delaney from Minjeribah/Stradbroke Island.


And the Artist who made the Traditional Necklace is Grandma Wasie Tardent (Wasie Ata) from Erub Island in the Torres Strait, Far North Queensland. 


The tickets will be drawn at the conference dinner. We have ticket sellers out there if you are interested, just let us know and we will find a way to come to you, especially if you live in Brisbane. Thank you.


And the Artist who made the Traditional Necklace is Grandma Wasie Tardent (Wasie Ata) from Erub Island in the Torres Strait, Far North Queensland. 

We are also raffling these Beautiful pieces by Aboriginal Artist Jordana Angus, Jordana is a proud Wiradjuri woman and her traditional land is Narrandera, NSW. However she was born and raised in Redcliffe, Queensland so her connection is to the land and to the sea. As an Aboriginal artist Jordana uses her artworks as a way to express her culture and she is currently studying a Bachelor of Contemporary Australian Indigenous Art in Brisbane which she hopes will further her artistic ability by experimenting and introducing new techniques and mediums into her work...




The first piece (on the left) is titled 'Collecting pipis'
Medium: Permanent marker on coloured ink
Date: 2015


Story: This piece symbolises collecting pipis on the shore of the beach and using the traditional fish traps that were used in traditional hunting practices but overall it is about keeping our culture and traditions alive through the art of passing down cultural knowledge and traditions.

The second piece (on the right) is titled 'Saltwater and Desert'
Medium: Permanent marker on coloured ink
Date: 2015


Story: This piece addresses the connection people feel to geographical places which hold memories for, or are important to them. On a broader scale this piece also relates to how two opposing locations or even people can still intertwine and co exist in a harmonious way despite their differences by embracing them.

Size of the paintings, approximately A5

Raffle tickets: $2 each or 3 for $5


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C O N F E R E N C E   P R O G R A M (subject to change) 



WORLD FIRST NATIONS TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE:


SAY IT LOUD, SAY IT CLEAR; WE WERE ALWAYS HERE!



23 – 26 August, 2016~ Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre


South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia


~ Rooms B1, B2 & B3 (1st Floor) on the Grey Street 


Entrance...(up from the Southbank Cineplex)




Jagera Arts Community Hall




We pay Homage & Respect to the Traditional Owners, Ancestors, Elders and Custodians of the Australian Land, Waterways, Seas and Islands...




DAY ONE TUESDAY 23rd August, 2016 - 

Venue: Jagera Arts Community Hall, 121 Cordelia Street, South Brisbane


6:45 – 7:30 MC Pammy White & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop - Dawn Ceremony / Traditional Welcome to Country – Kerry Charlton & Team


7:45 – 9:30 Cuppa & Breakfast


9: 40 – 10:20 Dance, Poetry & Song:

Aunty Dawn Daylight

Bernard Kelly-Edwards

Choir


10:30 – 12:20 Panel of Speakers:

Professor Gracelyn Smallwood, Dr Lilla Watson, Dr Mary Graham, Dr Otrude Moyo, Dr Jackie Huggins,

Aunty Mona Phillips, Aunty Valda Coolwell, Uncle Thomas Sebasio, Aunty Rose Elu, Uncle Terry Williams, Reverend Alexandra Gater, Aunty Flo Watson, Aunty Betty McGrady


12:30 - 2:30 Lunch

Presenters:

Aunty Dawn Daylight

Choir

Poetry: Bernard Kelly-Edwards




DAY TWO - Wednesday 24th August, 2016

Venue: Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre



MORNING SESSION

Theme 1. LORE: Traditional Lore and Customary Practices


8:00 – 8:45 Registration / Tea & Coffee

8:50 – 9:00 Housekeeping & Introduction: MC – Pammy White & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop

9:00 – 9:25 Traditional Owners Session – Kerry Charlton


9:30 – 10:30 Keynote Address: Whaea Te Raina Ferris & Dr Payi Linda Ford


10:35 – 10:55 MORNING TEA (20 mins)


11:00 – 12:30 

Special Guest Presenters: Poetry /Song - Dr Michael Adams, Rose Elu,

Ms. Jeannie Bell.


12:30 – 1:15 LUNCH (60 mins)



AFTERNOON SESSION 

Theme 2. KNOWLEDGE: First Nations Knowledge and Ways of Being


Facilitator/s: Dr Gregory Phillips & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop


1:15 – 2:15 Keynote Address: Mr Eilif Norvang, Dr Otrude Moyo


2:20 – 3:30

Special Guest Presenters: Mr Issac Akande, Ms Merepaea Manukau, Dr Vanessa Lee


3:35 – 3:55 AFTERNOON TEA (20 mins)


3:55 – 4:50 

Special Guest Presenters - Ms Wendy Watego, Mr Stephen Corporal


5:30 – 7:30 Earth Law Presentations at Avid Reader Bookshop, Boundary Street,

West End.


Presenters: Michael Connolly, Michelle Malone and Ross Williams

Poetry: Bernard Kelly-Edwards, Dr Vanessa Lee, 



DAY THREE - ELDERS DAY Thursday 25th August, 2016


MORNING SESSION 

Theme 3. CULTURE: Making meaning of our Cultural Stories, Songs, Languages and Dances

Theme 4. MEDICINE: Traditional Medicines and Ways of Healing


8:30 – 8:45 Housekeeping & Introduction: MCs – Kerry Charlton & Wendy Watego Ittensohn

Song - Rochelle Pitt Watson


8:50 – 10:20 Plenary Session Elders Panel:

Aunty Kathy Brown, Aunty Flo Watson, Aunty Val, Aunty Valda Coolwell, Uncle Albert Holt, Aunty Millianna Davey, Aunty Rayleen Burns, Aunty Christine Barney, Aunty Glenice Croft, Dr Lilla Watson, Dr Mary Graham, Aunty Mona Phillips, Whaea Raina Ferris, Eilif Norvang, Uncle Thomas Sebasio, Aunty Rose Elu, Uncle Terry Williams, Reverend Alexandra Gater, Aunty Edna Billy, Uncle Sam Watson, Uncle Des Sandy, Aunty Mary Martin, Aunty Jennifer Thompson, Aunty Betty McGrady, Aunty Dawn Daylight, Aunty Bess Catley, Aunty Valmai Burns, Jeannie Bell.


10:30 – 10:50 MORNING TEA (20 mins)


11:00 – 12:30 Concurrent Sessions Venue: B1, B2, B3


Facilitators: Gregory Phillips & Darlene Auger - Song - Rochelle Pitt Watson


Elders Presentations: Aunty Flo Watson, Aunty Valda Coolwell, Aunty Mary Martin, Aunty Elaine Peckham, Jeannie Bell, Aunty Christine Barney, Uncle Terry Williams, Uncle Thomas Sebasio, Aunty Betty McGrady, Uncle Des Sandy


12:30 – 1:15 LUNCH (60 mins)


1:20 – 3:15 AFTERNOON SESSION: 

 Facilitators: Sara, Holly Pedersen & Issac Akande


Elders and Young People Dialogue

All Elders in groups of 10 in Rm B1, B2 & B3 with young people aged between 18 – 30.

Young People: Darren Brady, Tj Diop, Murrawah Maroochy, Ami Diop, Nancy Belthuis,

Sara Ahmed, - other young people to be advised


3:20 – 3:40 AFTERNOON TEA (20 mins)

3:45 – 4:50 Elders Plenary Session in all rooms.


5:30 – 7:30 Presentations Caring for Mother Earth at Avid Reader Bookshop, Boundary Street,

West End. 


Presenters to be advised

Music: Avi & Band

Poetry: Bernard Kelly-Edwards, Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop


DAY FOUR - Friday 26th August, 2016


MORNING SESSION

Theme 5. SPIRIT: Wellness Pathways for our Spiritual, Social, Emotional & Psychological 

Health & Wellbeing


8:30 – 9:00 Housekeeping & Introduction: MC –  Ms Wendy Watego Ittensohn, Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop


9:00 – 10:30 Keynote Address: Ms Darlene Auger, Dr Gregory Phillips


10:35 – 10:55 MORNING TEA (20 mins)


Song / Poetry


11:00 – 12:30 - Concurrent Sessions - B1, B2, B3


Facilitator/s: Mrs Margie Kennedy & Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop & Ms Wendy Watego Ittensohn


Special Guest Presenters: Ms Rochelle Pitt Watson, Ms Rachel Petero, Ms Pammy White,

Aunty Mary Martin, Aunty Jennifer Thomson, Aunty Christine Barney


12:30 – 1:15 LUNCH (60 mins)


AFTERNOON SESSION

Theme 6. LAW: Cultural Ways of Knowing & Cultural Ways of Doing in Law & Justice


1:15 – 2:15 Keynote Address: Professor Boni Robertson, Reverend Alexandra Gater


2:20 – 3:10 - Plenary 

Special Guest Presenters: Uncle Sam Watson, Mr Getano Bann  


3:20 – 3:40 AFTERNOON TEA (20 mins)


3:45 - 4:45

Special Guest Presenters: 

Aunty Betty McGrady, Dr Noritta Morseu-Diop



**Please note that some Elders named here may not be present due to health and family matters, thank you


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DINNER ENTERTAINMENT - Friday Evening 26th August, 2016


6:30 – 6:45pm   Arrival – (Please present dinner ticket at registration desk)

7:00pm              Dinner 

7:15pm              MC - Mr Getano Bann

7:20pm              Special Guest Speaker: Mr Danny Morseu 

7:40pm              Lucky Door Prize draw - Ms Aminata Diop

                           Auction - Mr Getano Bann

                           Raffle Draw - Ms Holly Pedersen


8:00 - 12pm 

                          Guest Performers & Poets

                          Roydon & Jemma

                          Bernard Kelly-Edwards

                          UQ South Pacific Islander Association Dancers

                          Troy Brady 

                          Getano Bann

                          Glenn Skuthorpe

                          Rochelle Watson Pitt

                          George Alfred & Band



 


*Please note that some presenters and performers named here may not be present on the day due to illness or family & work commitments, we apologise for any inconvenience, thank you.